Kettle Bells for Women

Ladies — do you feel apprehensive about lifting weights?  Well, read on.

You know that physical activity offers huge benefits and that strength training is an important key to staying healthy and active throughout your lifespan. But strength training can offer more than just leaner legs. In additional to the obvious physical benefits, people who participate in weight lifting receive significant psychological benefits as well, including reduced stress and alleviation of depression.

Kettlebells can offer a less scary approach to lifting weights because they aren’t so masculine looking and you can use them in a functional way. Also, depending on genetics and diet, some women are able to dramatically change their shape with the use of weights such as kettlebells, with benefits beyond fitting into a new pair of jeans. 

In addition to being a tremendous form of exercise for increasing strength and endurance and the associated fat-loss, kettlebells are beneficial for increasing mobility and range of motion around the joints of the body. This may actually be the most lasting benefit from kettlebell training since mobility becomes more important as we age. All the strength in the world is of little use to an immobile body.

The following workout, which is appropriate for both men and women and is from St. Louis, Brentwood and Clayton, MO personal trainers, is a great way to introduce yourself to the benefits of kettlebell training. Before combining the movements into a circuit, make sure you have mastered each movement individually for several reps in a row. Complete the recommended number of reps for each exercise in the order given and then rest for 60 seconds before moving on to the next round (for a total of three rounds).

Halo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hold a light Kettlebell by the horns, which are the vertical sides of the handle. The handle is facing downwards and the bottom of the kettlebell is facing up.

Bring the hands to one side of your head and let the kettlebell drop down behind the head as one arm circles over and across the top of the head.

Continue the circle all the way around until the kettlebell is back to the starting position. The kettlebell drops lower as it comes to you and raises again as it moves back up in front. That is one full revolution. Continue circling for 10 or more repetitions in the same direction, then reverse directions to circle in the other direction. Again repeat for 10 or more repetitions. Alternatively, you can use time instead of reps, such as 30 seconds or 1 minute in each direction.

Swing

  • Step 1: Stand with feet slightly wider than shoulder width and toes pointing at 11:00 and 1:00.
  • Step 2: Grasp kettlebell with two hands while keeping arms straight (do not bend elbows), head looking straight ahead, and keep shoulder blades back and pinched together.
  • Step 3: Unlock hips to lower kettlebell, let kettlebell drop between legs, and then thrust hips to “pop” up and use momentum of hips to swing kettlebell up to shoulder height.

Goblet squat

  • Step 1: Take a kettle bell and hold it right under your chin with both hands.
  • Step 2: Stand with your feet a little wider then shoulder width apart.
  • Step 3: Squat down to a 90 degree angle and then stand back up.
  • Step 4: This completes one repetition.

Snatch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take a wider than shoulder width stance while bending your knees. Hold a kettlebell in one hand with an overhand grip (palms facing in). Position the kettlebell on the ground between your feet. Explode up while raising the kettlebell up above your head to the top position. Slowly lower the kettlebell down to the starting position and repeat.

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

Halo

3

4 circles right, 4 circles left

NA

Swing

3

8

NA

Goblet squat

3

8

NA

Snatch

3

4 left arm, 4 right arm

Rest 60 seconds before repeating the exercises

Whether you choose kettlebells or some other form of resistance, don’t miss out on the benefits of strength training.

For more information on lifting weights by using kettlebells, contact Maurie Cofman, CMES, CES, TBMM-CES, Personal Trainer, Certified Medical Exercise Specialist, Health Coach and Corrective Exercise Specialist in the St. Louis, Brentwood, and Clayton, MO area.