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Roast Turkey with Caramelized Onion-Balsamic Gravy


I love this turkey recipe. The key is the gravy, which rewards all your efforts with a creamy, rich taste. For ease, it can be started the day before or when you put the turkey up to roast. You won't want to wait for the holidays to use this recipe.

ROAST TURKEY:
• 4 TBSP Olive oil
• 1 tsp salt
• 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
• 1 TBSP Paprika
• 1 TBSP garlic powder
• 3 TBSP apricot rib sauce or duck sauce
• 1 (10-14-pound) turkey, fresh or defrosted
• 8-10 ounces apricot nectar or pineapple juice

GRAVY:
• 6 cups chicken stock, turkey neck and giblets (optional)
• 1 onion quartered
• 1 bay leaf
• 6 TBSP balance butter
• 2 large onions, halved and thinly sliced
• 1 tsp dried rosemary
• 1 tsp dried sage
• 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
• 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar

ROASTED TURKEY:
Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees. Make a paste out of the olive oil, salt, pepper, paprika, garlic powder, and apricot rib sauce.
Rub the spice mixture all over the turkey. Place turkey breast side down, in a large roasting pan. You can sprinkle on more the the pepper, paprika and garlic powder, if desired. Let turkey come to room temperature for 20 minutes. Bake 2 hours, covered.
Lower the temperature to 350 degrees and uncover. Turn turkey, breast side up, being careful not to prick skin. Bake 1 hour.
Flip turkey over again and baste with apricot nectar or pineapple juice every 5 minutes for 1/2-1 hour. Turkey is done when juices run clear when pierced with a fork. Place turkey on serving platter; reserve liquid in pan for gravy.

GRAVY:
Combine the chicken stock, turkey giblets if desired, quartered onion, and bay leaf in a pot. Simmer about 1 hour or until reduced to 3 cups of liquid, skimming the surface if necessary.
In a large skillet, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add sliced onions, rosemary, and sage and sauté about 15 minutes or until onions are golden. Add flour, stir 1 minute. Gradually whisk in chicken stock mixture, discarding bay leaf and quartered onion. Boil about 3 minutes or until gravy thickens; stirring often.


Courtsey of Kosher by Design